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TM44 Air Conditioning Inspection

Integrated Compliance has a specialist division that carry out TM44 inspections, we are regularly asked about what is involved and importantly, are they required? So, why is there a need for TM44 inspections for your air conditioning system? Read on to find out more.

Inspection, maintenance and cleaning programmes maintain the ability of the air conditioning system to provide healthy and comfortable environments for building occupants, limiting the escape of refrigerant and ensuring the safety of equipment. Building owners and managers who control air conditioning systems have statutory obligations and duties of care in the operation and maintenance of air conditioning systems.

When would a TM44 Air Conditioning Inspection be required?

Current legislation states that all air conditioning systems with a cooling output of more than 12 kw should be regularly inspected by an accredited TM44 energy assessor, however, each inspection is only required every five years after the installation.

The TM44 Inspection Report

A TM44 Air Conditioning Inspection would include:

  • A review of the air conditioning systems, and their controls
  • Examination of all documentation and advice on recommended requirements
  • An estimation of whether systems are suitably sized for cooling loads in treated spaces
  • Advice on any improvement recommendations which might involve simple low cost no cost solutions or replacement and alternative options.

The purpose of the inspection and the resulting report are to ensure that building owners or managers are provided with basic information that gives an indication of the likely efficiency of the air conditioning systems that they control, together with some initial advice on how energy efficiency or effectiveness of these systems might be improved.

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FAQ’s

How do I test or monitor legionella from my water system?

Where monitoring for legionella is considered appropriate, the sampling method should be carried out in accordance with BS7592 and the biocide, if used, neutralised where possible. Water samples should be tested by a UKAS-accredited laboratory that takes part in a water microbiology proficiency testing scheme such as that run by Public Health England. The laboratory should also apply a minimum theoretical mathematical detection limit of <= 100 legionella bacteria per litre of sample for culture-based methods.

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